Demystifying Decision Criteria and Assessment

This week in England there’s much social media mirth about this photo.

‘Twas taken by an understandably irate academic.

One expecting up to 400 students to turn up.

Yet as you can see, not a single undergrad bothered.

They were English students at Birmingham University. A wonderful and premier institution. Although I’m bound to think that as an alma mater of mine, the local neighbour Aston pips it, “obvs”.

We’ve all missed the odd lecture. What was the title that so underwhelmed?

“Demystifying Marking Criteria and Assessment”

Which – like the lady presenting herself – struck me as a pretty important topic.

Whilst there appears some confusion as to whether this event was either advertised or non-compulsory, the subject itself is worth an examination.

Entitling this blog, I simply switch Marking for the related Decision.

On the very first solution selling course I ever took, buyer ‘decision making’ was at the core.

Uncovering how it takes shape being critical to your ambitions. It must be tracked down from that very first call.

Back in the day – and subsequently reinforced elsewhere all around the globe – there are two parts; process & criteria.

These encompass many facets of how they’ll arrive at their decision.

From the steps they expect to take, to the personnel involved, over which timings.

As well as what carries particular weight from their initial wishlist to ranking offerings’ capability and match, both today and for tomorrow.

There are classic questions to help you focus through this lens;

How will you choose? Who will decide? What’s important? Which is most critical? When must you take delivery? Where are you looking?

The key, is to know that you need to do this, and that it should shape a major portion of your own best-practice sales process too.

Surely no session on that would give you an empty room….

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