How Many Seconds Have You Or Your Prospect Got?

I happened upon a digital agency. On their homepage, I was delighted to find writ large the above ‘problem statement’ teaser.

I remember meeting the very first such outfits back in the mid-90s. They were mainly all about the tech. Occasionally you’d meet one that’d come from a Marketing background. Both would tell you that only they “make sites that get results”. The techies would tell you that they really owned the internet. The Marketeers would tell you that they really owned the internet.

The above F-U-D pitch on ‘stickiness’ made me think of other ‘blink‘ reactions.

Who hasn’t been troubled by the supposed interviewer bias? Highlighted in psychology studies when placing a button under their desk. To see how long it takes for it to be pressed once they’ve made their call. If you’ve not heard this b-school staple tale, the outcomes where shockingly decided within just seconds. Even this very month, freshly backed up by Yale research. Which reported that if class bias is at play, you’ve just your first seven words to gain selection.

Then there’s the opening cold call salvo. Old-schoolers equate this to holding a lit match. You’ve only the short time before you fingers burn to enable an entry.

And how about today’s evolution? With mere nanoseconds to prevent your version of the Tinder swipe left rejection. So…

On average, your website has just 5 seconds to make a good impression on your visitors. Are you geared up to make them stay?

If this is indeed true – and the veracity counts less than the potential thoughts it triggers – then surely every buyer has their equivalent?

In your world what would such a statement perhaps be?

One that may well keep them up at night…

Can you dig into your own problem statements and produce your prospect-facing similar?

And that’s before we consider how this applies to our own pitching window too….

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